Product

Improving Bookkeeping Accuracy with Book Transfers, Category Splits, & Enterprises

Photo of Atticus Graven
Photo of Maika Koehl

By Maika Koehl & Atticus Graven

Aug 30, 2022

The Ambrook Team has been crossing state lines and visiting farms of all acreages to ensure that the product we’re building is easy to use and solves real problems. Every feature update below was requested by one or more pilot partners.


Book Transfers

We also heard that you need to track how revenues and costs are passed between your distinct enterprises. This inspired book transfers. An internal book transfer won’t affect your tax return, but will show how each enterprise is performing individually.

For example, transfer funds for milk at market price over to your dairy enterprise from your cheese processing enterprise. Your dairy enterprise sees it as a revenue, while your cheese enterprise sees it as a cost.


Split Categorization

Sometimes one purchase needs to be split between multiple categories for Schedule F reporting. Now you can easily split when categorizing—evenly or unevenly.


Products are now called Enterprises

We have learned from all of you that running a profitable ag business means leaning into multiple business opportunities like value-added processing, on-farm energy, educational programming, events, or vacation rentals. We’ve broadened our Enterprise (formerly Product) tagging system so you can accurately represent every form of your income.


Thanks as always for reading. In case you missed our last update, you can read our Teams announcement here. We’re always eager to hear your feedback and new requests!

Share your feedback or questions!

Authors


Photo of Maika Koehl

Maika Koehl

Maika Koehl is Ambrook’s Chief of Staff, and has spent her career untangling problems across the food supply chain. Most recently, she led operations at Vori, a startup building software for independent grocers. Prior to that she launched and scaled Uber’s freight marketplace globally. Maika is driven by a strong belief that everyone in these foundational industries - farmers, grocers, and truckers included - deserve tools that improve their lives.

Photo of Atticus Graven

Atticus Graven

Atticus has a Masters in Agricultural and Resource Economics from UC Davis. Prior to joining Ambrook, he spent 6 years with The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission teasing out intent and incentives from transactional data in the US organized energy markets. Now, Atticus has returned to his true passion—supporting farmers to feed the world in a sustainable, non-exploitative way that reconnects us all to the food we eat. Follow him on Twitter @AtticusGraven.

Illustrative image of a person looking out a window at a field

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